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All Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure Technical Note and Results

March 15, 2015

Contributors: Ashish Gupta, MD; Kalojan Petkin, MD; Laurent Lafosse, MD; Gonzalo Samitier Solis, MD; Gonzalo Samitier Solis, MD

BACKGROUND: Anterior instability is a difficult clinical problem that is treated by a variety of open and arthroscopic methods with good results. We present here a detailed video demonstration of the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure at our institution. This procedure is fully arthroscopic and combines the advantages of the open procedure with those of arthroscopic stabilization. As an adjunct, the video is accompanied with preliminary mid-term results and our specific staged rehabilitation program. METHODS: The senior surgeon?s case list (LL) from a single facility was reviewed to identify patients that had undergone arthroscopic Latarjet procedure between December 2003 to June 2008. History of recurrent dislocation was evaluated. All patients completed the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability (WOSI) Index, a disease specific, validated quality of life measurement tool for patients with shoulder instability. RESULTS: Eighty-seven patients (89 shoulders) were identified that met our inclusion criteria. Sixty-two of 87 (71.3%) patients (64/89 shoulders) were available for follow up. Mean follow up was 76.4 months (6.4 years), with a range of 61.2-100.7 months. Mean patient age at surgery was 29.4 years (range 17.1 - 57.4). One patient underwent shoulder arthroplasty after the index procedure, but had no recurrent instability prior to this. Of the remaining patients, 0/63 reported a dislocation since their surgery. One of 63 reported having subluxations since the procedure. Thus only 1/63 (1.59%) shoulders had recurrent instability after the procedure. The mean aggregate WOSI index was 9.4±9.4 (score is expressed on a scale of 0 to 100, with lower scores being more favorable). At 26mo complication rate was 11% with four reoperations and one revision case. CONCLUSIONS: In selected cases, when soft tissue procedures are predicted to be insufficient, the Latarjet procedure, open or arthroscopic, is a very reliable surgical technique with very low recurrency rate, good specific outcome scores, and an aceptable complication rate. Arthroscopic Latarjet technique started in 2003 at our institution; since then, it has been continuosly evolving offering promising results thus it could be considered as a surgical option when a bone block procedure is needed to treat shoulder instability.

Results for "Shoulder: Instability"

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